Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1—What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Medical Leadership – What and Why

Leadership in the Medical Field: Series Part 1 —What It Is & Why It’s Critical

Today we have the first post in a three-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree. You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of the article.

Leadership in the medical and healthcare field is a critically important subject. It is important for healthcare personnel, those interested in the field and the public to examine at some length. Leadership determines the quality of healthcare provided to patients even during periods of relative stasis. Thus, the topic needs to be provided to all healthcare provider students. That is from those currently completing a medical assistant program to postdoctoral physician fellows. Further, the authority provided by effective leadership helps maintain measured calm. That is through the upcoming periods of change scheduled to take place in the US through 2020 according to the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

Through this series of three articles, we plan to examine what’s meant by the term “medical leadership.” We will discuss why it’s so important to both professionals in the field and patients. What personal attributes are required to be an effective leader. Also the means by which effective leaders work with other healthcare providers.

What is Effective Medical Leadership?

Effective medical leadership is more than the ability to bark out instructions and orders for subordinates to follow and complete. Rather, as Matt Green and Lynne Gell indicate in their recent article for BMJ Career’s website, “Effective Medical Leadership for Consultants: Personal Qualities and Working with Others,” the term is best defined through a theoretical framework that includes the many qualities required of the term and the interactive ways in which it’s demonstrated. As O*Net Online indicates—for a representative healthcare position, a registered nurse (RN)—leadership in the healthcare field also includes aspects of “strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling…. and coordination of people and resources.”

The Medical Leadership Competency Framework

In order to illustrate the qualities, types of qualities and the means of demonstrating leadership, the National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation & Improvement and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges together developed the Medical Leadership Competency Framework  annotated diagram above. This figure allows physicians and other healthcare workers to visually review the different aspects of medical leadership. They can self-assess themselves as to areas that might require improvement or training. The diagram is in the shape of a circle to represent the holistic ideal of quality of medicine. Within the circle’s core is the ultimate goal, “Delivering the Service.” The center of the circle opens to the outside via five separate lanes. These effectively divide the outer aspect of the framework’s circle into five wedge-like areas that represent the ways in which leadership is demonstrated:

  • Demonstrating personal qualities.
  • Working with others.
  • Managing services.
  • Improving services.
  • Setting direction.

Each of these wedge-like areas is further comprised of four primary characteristics. These indicate how leadership in that particular area is best demonstrated. In Part II and Part III of this article series, we’ll explore what the four primary characteristics are for two of the areas “demonstrating personal qualities” and “working with others.”

Why is Effective Medical Leadership Deemed “Critical?”

As Green and Gel summarized in their paper cited earlier, the connection between effective medical leadership and good medical care is “well documented” and the “key to delivery high quality care and a positive experience for patients.” In part 2 of this series, we’ll discuss further the specific personal qualities that make a good leader in the medical field.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

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Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

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Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

 

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Friday Quotes – Career Development – Have the Confidence To Change Your Mind

Change your mind

Quotes – Career Development – Have the Confidence To Change Your Mind

  1. Always remember, YOU have the power to change your life because YOU have the power to change your mind! Anon
  2. You’re only as young as the last time you changed your mind. Timothy Leary
  3. You have to change your mind with every orchestra because every orchestra has a different character. Kurt Masur
  4. Sometimes all it takes to change a life is to decide which beliefs do not serve you and to literally change your mind about those beliefs. Joy Page
  5. Life can be like a roller coaster… And just when you think you’ve had enough, and you’re ready to get off the ride and take the calm, easy merry-go round… You change your mind, throw you hands in the air and ride the roller coaster all over again. That’s exhilaration…that’s living a bit on the edge…that’s being ALIVE. Stacey Charter
  6. Whatever you hold in your mind will tend to occur in your life. If you continue to believe as you have always believed, you will continue to act as you have always acted. If you continue to act as you have always acted, you will continue to get what you have always gotten. If you want different results in your life or your work, all you have to do is change your mind. Anon
  7. You are always free to change your mind and choose a different future, or a different past. Richard Bach
  8. Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way. Edward de Bono
  9. When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, sir? John Maynard Keynes
  10. By simply changing our mind with the same ease with which we change our socks, we can move from lack to abundance, absence to presence, persecution to empowerment; and by observing our internal dialogue and reversing the content, pitch, cadence, and conviction of our thoughts in another direction entirely, we can, as an artist before a canvas, paint a whole new reality before us. Saleem Rana
  11. Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything. George Bernard Shaw
  12. I wonder where you got that idea from? I mean, the idea that it’s feeble to change your mind once it’s made up. That’s a wrong idea, you know. Make up your mind about things, by all means – but if something happens to show that you are wrong, then it is feeble not to change your mind, Elizabeth. Only the strongest people have the pluck to change their minds, and say so, if they see they have been wrong in their ideas. Enid Blyton, The Naughtiest Girl in the School
Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

How to Choose a Keynote Speaker

Choosing the right keynote speaker

How to Choose a Keynote Speaker

This guest post is from Anna Mendez. Anna began her career working for an event planning company. Today, she is one of the company’s top event planners and has booked several keynote speakers.

Almost every event requires a keynote speaker. A keynote speaker’s role is to deliver a speech crafted to pull the event together around a uniting message, concept or theme. Choosing the right keynote speaker for your event can be a nerve-wracking process, especially if it is the first time you have done so. But, it doesn’t have to be stressful if you follow these simple steps.

First, you have to determine a few factors about the keynote speakers you are interested in. Are they relatable? Do they make you laugh (or cry, or whatever emotional response you are hoping for)? Is their fee within your budget; if not, are they willing to work with you? These and other considerations can take the guesswork out of choosing the right keynote speaker for your next event.

Agency Versus Solo Search

One of the first things you’ll want to decide is whether you plan to use a speakers bureau to help you find your speaker or whether you are going to do the work yourself. Perhaps you have a team of people who are in charge of planning the event and one of them has some experience with hiring a speaker. Maybe you have a few speakers in mind and you’d like to contact them before you reach out to a bureau. On the other hand, maybe you are new to hiring speakers and you want an expert to handle the process for you. These considerations can help you decide whether to hire a professional agency to find your speaker. Keep in mind that while the agency will likely offer a higher price for the speaker than you would get if you contacted them directly, it is also not always possible to contact certain speakers directly if they have an agency contract. Also, with an agency, you have a guarantee that contracts will be honored and the money will be handled professionally.

In Person Versus Sight Unseen

The best way to screen motivational keynote speakers is to see them speak before you actually hire them. Sometimes this is possible if the speaker is speaking at an event near you. If you are able to do this, you will want to look for eye contact, clarity, how the speaker handles props and/or notes, audience engagement, sincerity and the overall content of the speech. You may have very specific needs — a speaker who can share serious topics in a humorous way, for example. If you are not able to see your selected speaker live, see if there is a video you can watch. You can ask for referrals from past clients and question how satisfied they were with the speaker. However, if you work with a speaker bureau, they often are able to provide these things.

Contract, Rider and Price

Before you seal the deal, you will want to thoroughly review your speaker’s contract, rider and price. The contract tells you who handles payment, when and how payment will be made, what happens if the unexpected occurs (the speaker gets sick, there is poor weather, etc.) as well as other aspects. Because agencies tend to use a standard contract, while speakers who book themselves may have a totally different contract, there is a great deal of variance within the industry. In the same way, the bigger “name” your chosen speaker has, the more detailed their technical rider is likely to be. There are certain stars rumored to ask for only certain brands of bottled water in their dressing room, for instance. Carefully review every detail, and if you also have a contract that the speaker needs to sign, be sure they are willing to sign yours before you commit to signing theirs.

About the Author:  Anna Mendez began her career working for an event planning company. Today, she is one of the company’s top event planners and has booked several keynote speakers.

Managing People – Can an employer make an employee take a day as holiday?

Managing People – Can an employer make an employee take a day as holiday?

Here is yet another timely and very useful post from Annabel Kaye,  Irenicon – employment law in a mad world

Many employers have been asking staff to take a day’s holiday if they could not come in because of the snow. There have been a lot of misleading headlines about holiday and absence. Here are some useful facts.

  1. An employer cannot make someone go to work
  2. There is no general legal entitlement to be paid for days not worked and many contracts/staff handbooks specifically say employees won’t be paid for absence except under the sickness, holiday or parental leave scheme
  3. Employers who keep the workplace open may ask absent employees to chose to take holiday IF they want to be paid (as opposed to unpaid leave is there is no underlying entitlement to be paid in any event)……………You can read the rest of this post at this link 

Can an employer make an employee take a day as holiday?

 

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Managing People – Contracts of employment take a great deal of thought

Managing People – Contracts of employment take a great deal of thought

Following on from yesterday’s post about the Psychological Contract, Annabel Kaye,  Irenicon – employment law in a mad world, thought you would find this video useful. It is about how employers make life so much tougher for themselves than it needs to be by using another organization’s contracts. And Annabel is right, many employers do not understand how important the right contract is  in setting up good performance management and employee relations for the future. One size really does not fit all, better to reflect the spirit of that organization’s particular psychological contract.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Leadership – The Psychological Contract At Work

Work – Psychological contract

Leadership – The Psychological Contract At Work

This post discusses the theory of psychological contracts in the workplace and in the wider world outside work.

‘The Psychological Contract’ is increasingly relevant in workplace relationships.

The idea of Psychological Contract first emerged in the 1960s and it was widely discussed, particularly in the work of organizational and behavioral theorists Chris Argyris and Edgar Schein.

Many other experts have contributed ideas on the subject since then, and they continue to do so, either specifically focusing on the Psychological Contract, or approaching it from a particular or new perspective.   The Psychological Contract means many things to different people – it is open to a range of interpretations and theoretical studies.

Usually, the Psychological Contract refers to the relationship between an employer and their employees, and it relates to their concerns and their mutual expectations of that relationship, in terms of what each will put in and receive.

The Psychological Contract is usually seen from the standpoint or expectations of employees, although to understand it properly means you need to see it from both sides.

At its simplest, at work, the Psychological Contract is about fairness or balance. What can reasonably be expected! How will the employee be treated by the employer?  What will the employee put into the job? What will be the reward?

The closer you look at the real nature of the contract in any particular organization, the more complicated it becomes; there will be  unwritten “rules” and “expectations” on both sides.

The whole thing becomes more complicated when the organization is in change or when the outside environment intrudes – such as in times of recession when the employer’s ability to reward may be limited.

Of course, the theory and principles of the Psychological Contract can also be applied beyond the employment situation to human relationships, wider society and certainly in the world of politics between leaders and those led.

The concept of the Psychological Contract is still continuing to develop and it certainly is not recognized in all organizations.  It is even less well understood in the world outside work.

But respect, compassion, trust, empathy, fairness and objectivity – qualities that characterize the Psychological Contract, are worth the regard and respect of all of us, inside work and out.

contract

John Kotter – Communicating a Vision for Change

John Kotter – Communicating a Vision for Change

Dr. Kotter give you important tips about how to communicate a new vision.

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Stress-Reducing Techniques to Help Cope with School or College

Stress-Reducing Techniques to Help Cope with School or College

Today we have a guest post from Isaiah Banks who is a full-time graduate student studying health care administration. During his undergraduate studies, he realized academic stress was overtaking his life. He investigated stress-reducing techniques, which allowed him to study effectively and, he hopes, will eventually prepare him for healthcare management jobs. 

Image provided by Sara V. from Flickr’s Creative Commons

It’s no secret that school can be stressful. Pursuing a degree requires a student to perform at his or her absolute best. If this stress is left unchecked, it can be devastating to a student’s overall success, not to mention their entire well-being.

Fortunately, there are numerous ways to keep stress in check. Each technique will work differently, depending on your preferences as well as your mind and body. Take time to thoroughly practice each to find one, or even several,  that will work best for you.

Techniques to Reduce Your Stress

The can significantly below reduce stress. Explore these strategies until you find one that is right for you.

  • Meditation The state of your body and mind have a profound effect on your ability to handle pressure and conflicts. Pressure from professors, as well as internal conflicts, are a major source of stress. Regularly meditating can prevent stress from building up. Take time at the beginning of each day to sit in a comfortable position with your eyes closed. Attempt to clear your mind by focusing entirely on your breath. Count the length of your inhales and your exhales. This will provide your brain with more oxygen, and you’ll start the day with a clear head.
  • Time ManagementOne of the biggest sources of stress in a student’s life is worry. They worry about not getting everything done, worry about upcoming projects and worry about fitting in an active social life. However, this source of stress can be entirely eliminated by enacting a time management strategy. At the beginning of each week, create a schedule with everything you are required to complete. Include studying, classroom hours and projects that are due. Now, you can clearly see how the week ahead of you will transpire.
  • Proper NutritionAccording to the Mayo Clinic, having a well-balanced diet can alleviate stress by providing your mind and body the nutrients they need to function. When you do not receive required nutrients, your body goes into panic mode. This is aggravated by the external stresses of school. Depending on your degree, you may be aware that nutrition has a profound effect on a person’s ability to think clearly. Someone pursuing a master in health administration or a similar degree has likely covered this phenomenon in their studies.
  • Leisure TimeSchedule time to do whatever it is that you enjoy — whether this means relaxing on the couch, sitting by the pool or spending time with friends. Leisure time can help you process and release accumulated stress. Make an effort to not think or talk about your studies to maximize the quality of your leisure time.
  • Disconnecting from ElectronicsThe modern world is one of constant connection. It’s important to take time out of your day to disconnect. Turn off your laptop, smartphone and tablet. Don’t turn on the TV, either. Simply relax by yourself without having to process any external stimuli. This will significantly allow you to reduce and release stress.

Stress Can Be Avoidable

Carefully explore the above techniques to become a considerably less-stressed student. You’ve taken time to study, completed projects and done everything in your power to earn high grades. You owe it to yourself to put this same amount of effort into finding a way to reduce stress throughout your education. Not only will mastering one or two of these techniques help you make the most of your studies, it will also help you in your career and personal life. Forming a lifelong habit to cut down on stress can lead to a longer, happier and altogether more fulfilling life.

About the Author: Isaiah Banks is a full-time graduate student studying health care administration. During his undergraduate studies, he realized academic stress was overtaking his life. He investigated stress-reducing techniques, which allowed him to study effectively and, he hopes, will eventually prepare him for healthcare management jobs. 

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Wednesday Quotes – Career Development

What lies before us and what lies behind us ar...
What lies before us and what lies behind us are small matters compared to what lies within us. (Photo credit: legends2k)

Wednesday Quotes – Career Development

Wednesday Quotes for today prove lots of thoughts on the qualities you might want to develop through your career

  1. Unless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered, you will never grow. Ronald E. Osborn
  2. If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves. Thomas Edison
  3. Our doubts are traitors, and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt. Shakespeare
  4. Tough times don’t last, tough people do. Robert Schuller
  5. Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it…Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe
  6. Enthusiasm and persistence can make an average person superior. Indifference and lethargy can make a superior person average. William Ward
  7. People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing. Dale Carnegie
  8. Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect. Ralph Waldo Emerson
  9. Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom. General George Patton
  10. Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart. Confucius
  11. If you can DREAM it, you can DO it. Walt Disney
  12. You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself. Jim Rohn

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Management – Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Management – Dan Pink: The puzzle of motivation

Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward.

Bidding adieu to his last “real job” as Al Gore’s speechwriter, Dan Pink went freelance to spark a right-brain revolution in the career marketplace

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link