Advance Your Career

Advance Your Career

Advance Your Career – Today we have a guest post from Frank Anderson who is a contributing writer and full-time graduate student. He works for the HR department at a small law firm and enjoys mentoring new employees and helping them advance their careers.

Three Keys to Career Advancement

How did the boss become the boss? How can you make a similar move? Advancing your career can sometimes seem like a mysterious endeavor. Some people skyrocket up the corporate ladder, while others remain on the lower rungs for decades. Although there are many complex factors that go into career advancement in different industries, there are three overall keys that play a big part in receiving that big promotion.

The Three Keys of Advancement

Whether you long to find employment at a new company or advance with your current employer, these keys will serve you well throughout your professional life.

  1. Education Education is crucial to advancement in most industries. Even if it is not a requirement, continuing your education after beginning your career illustrates you are dedicated to developing yourself. For example, if you are looking to get into management, consider beginning to pursue an online masters degree in management. When the position becomes available and you submit your application, the hiring manager will notice that you received your degree while employed. This indicates you are truly dedicated to your career and this new position.
  2. Sincerity Being sincere in the workplace involves a number of things. Perhaps most importantly, it means always putting forward your best efforts. If you are assigned a project you don’t particularly enjoy, complete it cheerfully and to the best of your ability. Sincerity also means considering carefully any criticism or feedback you receive in the workplace. It’s easy to blame bosses or coworkers for making work unpleasant; however, look carefully and with sincerity at why you are uncomfortable. Perhaps the problem is coming from within you? Treating your job with commitment and sincerity will be noticed by your superiors and make you a more attractive candidate for a promotion.
  3. Define Advancement“Career advancement” can mean a number of different things to a business professional. It’s crucial you take some time to understand what this phrase means to you. Does it mean working for a certain department? Earning a certain salary? Once you have defined this term, you can then be single-minded in your approach. For example, if advancement means entering the human resources department, you might think about making a sincere effort to earn your human resources masters degree online. This will directly prepare you to advance your career by meeting the education requirements necessary for this department.

Additional Ways to Advance Your Career

  • Networking, Online and OffNetworking at conventions and other gatherings of business professionals has long been a good way to advance your career. It can help you find new clients, suppliers and even a new career. In recent years, online social networking has become very popular and useful. Participate in professional social networks like LinkedIn to further expand your job prospects.
  • Perception What image do you convey to senior management? The people who decide your next promotion probably already have a perception of you. Unfortunately, this perception may not always be based on factual information. You need to be viewed as someone who goes above and beyond the norm. Could you be the employee who shows up early and leaves late? And make sure, any project with your name on it is completed on time and with excellence.
  • ExposureIn an ideal world, advancing your career would depend solely on merit and qualifications; however, in the real world, it also depends on who you know and what they think of you. Having quality exposure to those a few rungs above you on the corporate ladder can be extremely helpful when it comes to the time to take your next few steps. Volunteer to attend meetings, ask to go to on management training courses and do whatever you can to make yourself known to senior management.

You Can Advance Your Career

Unfortunately, there is no set-in-stone formula for advancing your career. It will take a combination of the three keys above and the additional tips to truly advance your career; however, with hard work, you can reach the level that allows you to use your full potential.

About the Author: Frank Anderson is a contributing writer and full-time graduate student. He works for the HR department at a small law firm and enjoys mentoring new employees and helping them advance their careers.

  • Career development – How to keep your work and life balanced
  • Career Development – More IT jobs are in the cloud – Getting ready for the job you want in 2013
  • Career development – Moving Home Part 1 – Lofty Goals: Key Considerations Before Moving To A Big-City Apartment
Enhanced by Zemanta

Give thanks at work

Give thanks at work

The best way to give thanks at work  an interesting article from Katherine Reynolds Lewis

Give thanks at work – Bosses may think they’re showing gratitude to their staff, but more often than not, those thanks are not heard or believed. How to bridge the gratitude gap.

Employee appreciation may seem common in corporate America. Almost 80% of employers offer some kind of employee recognition program, according to the Society for Human Resource Management.

Yet workers feel unappreciated — a whopping 71% in the US are disengaged, according to Gallup. What is going on?

You can read this interesting article from Katherine Reynolds Lewis at this link

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Staff engagement

Staff engagement

Leadership and the keys to keeping your people engaged

Staff engagement – According to a study by global management consultancy, the Hay Group, these are, in summary, the key components of employee satisfaction (Lamb, McKee, 2004);

  • Trust and confidence in top leadership
  • Effective communication by leadership in three critical areas:
    • Providing Information that helps employees understand the company’s overall business strategy.
    • Helping employees understand how they contribute to achieving key business objectives.
    • Sharing information with employees both on how the company is doing and how an employee’s own division is doing — relative to strategic business objectives.

It is communication that is critical – without that you cannot win trust and confidence. Are you ready to be trustworthy and are you able to communicate a vision of where the organization needs to go?  If you want to be a leader may be  it is time to learn.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Network Marketing

Network Marketing

John Rohn on Sowing and Reaping

Network Marketing – advice from John Rohn – someone we can all learn from – great fun and great lessons too!

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Common Interview Questions

Common Interview Questions

Job Search – What are the most common interview questions? Help from monster.co.uk

Common Interview Questions – Although there is no set format that every job interview will follow, there are some questions that you can almost guarantee will crop up. Here’s a list of the most common questions and a guide to the kind of answers your interviewer wants to hear.

  • Tell me about yourself – This is usually the opening question and, as first impressions are key, one of the most important. Keep your answer to under five minutes, beginning with an overview of your highest qualification then running through the jobs you’ve held so far in your career. You can follow the same structure of your CV, giving examples of achievements and the skills you’ve picked up along the way. Don’t go into too much detail – your interviewer will probably take notes and ask for you to expand on any areas where they’d like more information. If you’re interviewing for your first job since leaving education, focus on the areas of your studies you most enjoyed and how that has led to you wanting this particular role.
  • What are your weaknesses? – The dreaded question, which is best handled by picking something that you have made positive steps to redress. For example, if your IT ability is not at the level it could be, state it as a weakness but tell the interviewer about training courses or time spent outside work hours you have used to improve your skills. Your initiative could actually be perceived as a strength. On no accounts say “I don’t have any weaknesses”, your interviewer won’t believe you, or “I have a tendency to work too hard”, which is seen as avoiding the question.
  • What are your strengths? – Pick the three biggest attributes that you think will get you the job and give examples of how you have used these strengths in a work situation. They could be tangible skills, such as proficiency in a particular computer language, or intangible skills such as good management. If you’re not sure where to start, take a look at the job description. There is usually a section listing candidate requirements, which should give you an idea of what they are looking for.

You can read more at this link

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Work and Life Balance

Work and Life Balance

Career development – How to keep your work and life balanced

Work and Life Balance – Today we have an article from our regular contributor,  Lindsey Harper Mac, on how to keep your work and life in balance. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.  You can find links to some of her earlier posts at the end of this article.

How to keep your work and life balanced

Work and Life Balance – Finding a job in today’s economy is no easy task – more people are seeking employment than ever before, many with more education and experience for entry-level positions. And once you secure a stable job, it can be difficult to find a balance between your work and personal lives. While excelling on the job is vital in today’s world, it is also important to maintain your home and personal relationships.

Occupational stress has become a prevalent issue for today’s workers – stress and its related issues are estimated to cost over $150 billion each year in the United States alone. But with some planning and creation of personal boundaries, you can reduce stress in your life.

Use financial tools

Stress related to personal finance can magnify other everyday stressors. If you are spending so much time concerned about your job performance, bank balance and student loan debt, how can you expect to maintain healthy relationships? To help manage your finances and your worry, consider:

  • Bank notifications – Most banks now offer mobile applications and notifications for smartphones. With customizable tools such as balance and overdraft alerts, you can automate your balance checks and stay on top of your accounts at all times.
  • Credit reports – Keeping up-to-date on your credit score and reports can help you avoid surprises when applying for a loan. You can get an annual credit report for free to verify all of your outstanding debts and look for signs of identity theft or inaccuracies that can lower your credit score.
  • Check insurance policies – If your budget has recently gotten tighter, it may be time to examine your insurance policies. Check your existing coverage to see if you can reduce costs through bundling.

Draw clear lines between home and work

It can be all too easy to let your work life bleed into your home life. While taking some reports home to review the night before a big presentation makes sense, taking work home every day of the week will lead to exhaustion and burnout. Being a go-getter will lead to new opportunities and promotions, but establishing boundaries will keep your stress levels down. Volunteer for occasional projects, but don’t allow yourself to be saddled with all of the work. Be honest with your boss, coworkers and yourself and reach out for help, should you feel overwhelmed.

Keep a schedule

Work and Life Balance – Keeping track of your work schedule, meetings and appointments can be difficult. Even if you feel like you’re constantly on the go, building a schedule online can reduce stress, especially if you tie Google Calendar to your mobile phone. The regular reminders and push notifications will make sure you don’t miss another appointment. Be sure to find space in your schedule for exercise, which can reduce stress and boost your energy.

The fast-paced schedules we keep can seem overwhelming and hectic at times. But planning and self-awareness can reduce stress and maximize your effectiveness at work. Be completely honest with yourself about the amount of work you can manage, and always reserve time for visiting with friends and keeping up with your favorite hobbies.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career development – Moving Home Part 1 – Lofty Goals: Key Considerations Before Moving To A Big-City Apartment

Career development – Moving Home Part 2 – Prepping for the big move!

Career Development – More IT jobs are in the cloud – Getting ready for the job you want in 2013

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Job Search Networking

Job Search Networking

Job Search Networking – Asking Friends For Help

Job Search Networking – there are lots of people who find networking difficult. They find it embarrassing.

But you do it all the time. You may, or may not do it well. And you may do it for all kinds of different motives – for example, to raise money for a local charity. But you do it just the same. Networking is just getting to know people and then offering them something (be it dinner or a sales product) and sometimes asking them for something.

Good networking is usually about reciprocity. So, what about networking when you are looking for a job? What is reciprocal about that?

Well, networking isn’t a short-term thing. The relationships you develop need to be built for the long-term – this is not about short-term exploitation; it is about investing something of yourself in a relationship that can stand the tests of time. At some point in any relationship, sometimes quite early on, there will usually be something one party asks of the other.

What makes a good networker?

Becoming a good listener and knowing how to encourage other people to talk are important skills, if you want to be a good networker. And both nee you to take, and show, a real interest in the other person. Listen hard and listen quietly – hear the words and the music in terms of their tone and the body language that accompanies their words. Most of us enjoy being listened to fully – it reinforces our sense of ourselves.

Learn to make the conversation flow – from what you have heard, link to a new question – learn about the how and the why as well as the what. Find out more about them. Then let them find out about you – be open and ready to show them a real person.

In networking, set up the relationship before you ask for anything. And in job search be clear about what you are asking. Of course, you can let them know that you are looking but do more than that. Find out from your contact about their organization and the sector they work in. What are the latest developments? And be honest about your request for help. Tell them a little about you and what you could bring with you – what is the value you might add if they do pass your name on.

Make sure they have your clear contact details and follow-up with a note of thanks. If you can give something back – perhaps you have a contact that might be useful for them – or you might find an article in a magazine or know of book they might like. Because you are asking for something doesn’t mean you have nothing to give back.  Just remember what I said above – networking is all about reciprocity.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

>

Career development – Moving Home Part 2 – Prepping for the big move!

Moving Home

Career development – Moving Home Part 2 – Prepping for the big move!

 Moving Home – today we have the second article in a two-part series from our regular contributor, Lindsey Harper Mac, on moving for work and as part of your career development. Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.  You can find links to Part 1 and some of her earlier posts at the end of this article.

Article 2 of 2 part series

 Moving Home – Prepping for the big move!

Moving Home – you have a new job – maybe in a new city, maybe on the other side of town – and you’ve decided that you need to move to be closer to work. You decide you’re not only joining a company but you’re joining a community, too.

Moving can be physically and mentally exhausting. You’re not just transferring all your possessions; you’re essentially preparing to live your life differently. And this moving process takes far more than a weekend. You spend time hunting for the right apartment or house, you decide what possessions you’ll keep and what you’ll get rid of and you start saying goodbye to friends you may not see for a while.

Altogether, planning for a move can take two or three months, so you need to think months ahead of schedule. Being prepared will make the entire experience easier.

Costs

Moving Home – along with security deposits and first-month’s rent, you may have to pay for moving truck rental, or for utility deposits at your new location. When you begin the search for a new job, find ways to save money then, before you have to consider moving. Keep in mind the financial pressures of moving, and prepare for unexpected costs. The same way you would save up for a new car or new computer, set aside money from each paycheck that might generally go towards dining out, buying decorations for your apartment or that new pair of jeans. What’s more important: the steak dinner, or a more comfortable bedroom?

Keeping a cool head

You already know that moving involves packing boxes, but it’s more than just that. Being highly organized can relieve some of the anxiety that comes from moving and living in a state of disarray for a short period of time. And following a few simple organization strategies can save you considerable time when you’re ready to unpack.

As you prepare to leave town for your new destination, don’t forget to make time for friends and family. Too often, it’s easy to get caught-up in moving and forget to say a proper goodbye to the important people in your life.

More than stuff

If you’re moving to another state, don’t expect your life to be exactly the same as it is now. How is the weather different in your new town? Will you be shovelling snow for half the year? Search online for neighbourhood information so you know the best restaurants, when trash day is and where to find great bargains.

Tie-up loose ends – transfer your bank accounts and utilities, and file a change-of-address notice with your local post office. Also let friends, family and creditors know individually what your new address is.

Moving home can be complicated. But it doesn’t have to be with real, goal-oriented preparation. To ensure a seamless move, take time to plot your goals well in advance, and make sure you have a system in place for packing and labeling all of your possessions.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specialises in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Also by Lindsey Harper Mac

Career development – Moving Home Part 1 – Lofty Goals: Key Considerations Before Moving To A Big-City Apartment

Career Development – More IT jobs are in the cloud – Getting ready for the job you want in 2013

Career Development Part 1 – Why Get An Advanced Degree? The Answer is Obvious

Career Development Part 2: Want a Promotion? Focus on Factors Within your Control

Career Development Part 3: Performance Reviews: Painful or Helpful?

Entrepreneurs Growing Forward

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules? | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

The Makings of a Great Leader | WiseWolf Talking – the WiseWolf Coaching Blog.

Make career planning a regular feature of working life

Make career planning a regular feature of working life

It doesn’t matter whether you’re an expatriate involved in the oil and gas industry in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), a teacher at one of the many international schools in Egypt, or an employee of a major multinational Middle East bank, charting a successful career path is a vital exercise no matter where you live and work. It should be a proactive exercise, not one carried out only when plans go wrong or when a career grinds to a stop inside some company cul-de-sac.

The world of international business continues to provide opportunities for expatriates, with tens of thousands moving abroad each year in a bid to better their lives. Banking and business finance have proved particularly lucrative areas of employment over the years, and will continue to do so as the needs of multinational companies grow ever larger in their attempts to circle the globe. However, much is expected of the individual within such organisations. And with the high salary paid comes enormous pressures, acceptable perhaps for a few years. But then what? That’s when career planning comes into its own.

Career planning ought to be an integral feature within our working lives and should be carried out on a regular basis, at least once every couple of years. Yet how many of us do so? When was the last time you sat down with someone and discussed your career options? Was it maybe during the last year at school or the final year at university? And over the years since then, you’ve muddled your way along a rather convoluted career path, probably never quite sure where it was all leading to. Recognise the scenario? If the answer is yes then it’s time to do something about it.

Take stock! Grab an hour or two from your busy schedule and sit down and relax. Turn off the mobile phone, the television, the radio. Tell everyone you’re unavailable. Then think back, to your first job, the second one and so on. If possible, analyse what you did and why. Could you have done anything differently? Be honest with yourself, critical, yes, but not self-destructive. You can’t change the past. But you can learn from the past and take any lessons with you into the future.

Mull over what you really want out of life. Is it more money, greater challenges and responsibilities, or a better quality of home life with more time spent with the family? What is it that you like about your life? What don’t you like? Grab a piece of paper and a pen and draw two columns, one headed ‘like’ and the other ‘dislike’. Go through everything, jotting each down in the appropriate column. Now, if there are lots of entries in the dislike column, and a fair number of them refer to your job, that’s a possible sign you need to change career. If circumstances don’t allow you to, you would certainly need to change something, anything, in order to begin to turn your life around.

A possible way forward is to up the level of any qualifications you may possess. Better qualifications usually mean more opportunities for advancement. But they can also take your career, and your life, in a whole different direction. Taking interests and hobbies more seriously can sometimes turn into career possibilities, too, something which you should at least consider.

Useful Resources:

Go here for more on career planning.

Banking Services in the UAE

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

>

Leadership Lessons From West Point

Leadership Lessons From West Point

The United States Military Academy at West Point holds its cadets to the highest military, academic, physical, and ethical standards. They practice excellence, a tradition that has held unwaveringly for over two hundred years. In Leadership Lessons from West Point, the Leader to Leader Institute and experts from West Point have joined forces to offer valuable advice on real–life leadership issues learned on or around the battlefield and applied to leaders in all settings. With Leadership Lessons from West Point as a guide, leaders in the business, nonprofit, and government sectors can learn leadership techniques and practices from contributors who are teaching or have taught at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and have served in positions of leadership that span the globe. These military experts cover a broad range of topics that are relevant to any leadership development program in any sector. The contributions in this important resource offer insight into what leadership means to these experts—in both war and peacetime—and describe their views on quiet leadership, mission, values, taking care of people, organizational learning, and leading change. Leadership Lessons from West Point contains candid reflections, compelling stories, best practices, and frontline ideas that will open a window into the world of leadership development where the values of duty, honor, and country set the standard for professional excellence.

“A wonderfully impressive book.  It′s impressive because of the authors′ credentials—all are leaders in their own right—and because of their honesty. Rarely will you find more open, self–disclosing discussions of failure, courage, and honor. It′s impressive because it′s heartfelt . . . it′s about selfless service, honesty, and integrity—things we need to hear more about from our leaders. Leadership Lessons from West Point will renew your hope, restore your faith, educate your mind, and expand your horizons. We highly recommend it.” —Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner, coauthors of the best–selling book, The Leadership Challenge

“Attention to detail, going about jobs correctly, and understanding that no job is too large or too small are just a few of the major aspects included in the West Point experience . . . Leadership Lessons from West Point does a great job of capturing those values and many others.” —Mike Krzyzewski, “Coach K,” head, Duke Basketball Program

“All those concerned with developing leaders for every walk of life should welcome this compilation of important lessons from inside West Point, producer of the cream of the crop.” —Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Harvard Business School, best–selling author of Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin and End

“The people at West Point have so much to teach all of us about how to lead, and any student of leadership will want to have this book on their shelf for continuous learning and reference.” —Patrick Lencioni, author, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

“The highly personal and compelling essays in this book offer a fascinating portrait of how the U.S. Military Academy approaches leadership education.” —John Alexander, president, Center for Creative Leadership

“Anyone interested in the ′L–word′ will find this humble sampling of tacit knowledge refreshing and insightful.” —Scott A. Snook, associate professor of organizational behavior, Harvard Business School

“An outstanding volume of leadership lessons relevant and useful to any institution.” —Warren Bennis, Distinguished Professor of Management at the University of Southern California and author, On Becoming a Leader

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

>