Recessionary Boom for Small Business

Today we have a guest post from Carlo Pandian who is a freelance writer based in Toronto.  He blogs about small business, accountancy and technology covering everything from Mac accounting software to cloud apps.

Recessionary Boom for Small Business

Times are tough for businesses of any size but it seems that the small business is having the better time of it.  Not only are small firms negotiating the perils of recession in Canada, but it is a trend that is being repeated globally.  In addition, the number of small firms being established is growing to record levels.  While this is partly an effect of the recession, as more people simply turn to themselves for employment, it’s also a great deal to do with technology.  Recent developments have made setting up and running a small firm far easier than in the past and the ability to run your own company is no longer limited to those with large amounts of cash or previous business experience.  Whatever the size of firm you run, using the following tools can allow you to grow and succeed, despite the difficulties of the recession.

Ancient Technologies

The internet is already beginning to seem old hat and that makes it easy to overlook as a key business tool.  Back in the nineties it was the biggest technological advance for possibly a century.  Since those days of creaking, bleeping and occasionally blipping modems we’ve come a long way.  The internet can even seem a bit boring; the reason being that it’s no more than a tool to many of us. We’ve become used to its presence and it’s now the way many of us shop, find entertainment or chat to friends.  The internet offers a solution for many things in life and for business this particular tool should be an essential one.

Forget Blue Skies; Clouds are Better

There’s a massive range of software available – much of it in cloud computing form – that can offer almost limitless benefits to your business.  Key online software includes accountancy software, HR software and CRM software.  Many of these tools are available on free trial basis and with the online versions you don’t have the hassle of installing, updating and fixing the software if there are problems.  Using cloud based software can free up hard drive space and relieve you of the IT maintenance duties that in the past may well have kept you up all night!

The art of getting paid

One area of concern for any business, but particularly small businesses, is payment.  Clients can be strangely payment averse occasionally and this trait holds some rather unpleasant pitfalls for small or new businesses.  Large firms have often more room for manoeuvre in this case, but small firms need cash flowing in faster than it flows out.  Again, advances in technology have meant that it doesn’t matter how micro you are, you can still have access to major payment solutions.  These involve simple online card payment tools and mobile payment solutions.  In Canada one service, GoPayment, enables small traders to turn their mobile phones into a card reader and take payment on delivery, rather than several months and a couple of legal letters later.  It’s a simple solution that no small firm should be without.

Oh, yes, phones

Talking of phones, where would any of us be without the Smartphone?  These have taken over our lives and offer small businesses the opportunity to go truly mobile and stay flexible.  Of course it doesn’t matter what size of firm you run, without a smart phone you are doomed to failure.  OK, so that’s going a little far, you can still succeed in business without the latest model.  However, it’s surprising just how much time your phone can save and combined with simple tools such as GoPayment, mentioned above, a phone can be just about all you’ll need in the way of office premises.

Carlo Pandian is a freelance writer based in Toronto and blogs about small business, accountancy and technology covering everything from Mac accounting software to cloud apps. Despite tough economic times, small businesses are thriving.  Technology that allows them to be more flexible than larger competitors is a crucial part of this recipe for small, but perfectly formed, success.  From online accounting to mobile payment solutions, technology is driving change in the business world faster than ever before.  

Friday Quotes – Inspiration from Strong Women

Friday Quotes
Martha Graham (Photo credit: cliff1066™)

Never give up, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn. Harriet Beecher Stowe

To achieve, you need thought. You have to know what you are doing and that’s real power. Ayn Rand

You must learn to be still in the midst of activity and to be vibrantly alive in repose. Indira Gandh

Not knowing when the dawn will come, I open every door. Emily Dickinson

If you want the rainbow, you’ve got to put up with the rain. Dolly Parton

You can write me down in history with hateful, twisted lies, you can tread me in this very dirt, but still, like dust, I’ll rise. Maya Angelou

The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities. Ayn Rand

Nobody cares if you can’t dance well. Just get up and dance. Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion. Martha Graham

I don’t want to get to the end of my life and find that I lived just the length of it. I want to have lived the width of it as well. Diane Ackerman

Joy has no cost. Marianne Williamson

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR.  She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – the WiseWolf Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Career Development – Tips for Succeeding in Your First Real-World Job

Today we have a very timely post for those who have just left college. It comes to us from Pepper Givens. Pepper is a freelance writer whose foremost passion is writing for her blog about education. While her primary writing focus is trends in higher ed, Pepper also enjoys writing about personal finance, parenting, sustainable living, small business strategies, and more. She can be reached for questions or comments at pepper.givens@gmail.com

Tips for Succeeding in Your First Real-World Job

So you’ve finally done it. The names have been called, the tassel has been moved and the degree is now in a nice frame on the wall—you’ve graduated college! For many, the path until this point has been a busy, stressful one muddled with successes and failures along the way. However, what so many recent grads don’t realize is this is only the beginning. Once the excitement and celebration passes, reality seeps in and the obligatory immersion into the real world begins.

For the not-so-lucky grads, a job may not be waiting, but for those that have already landed that full-time gig, it’s important to properly prepare oneself for what awaits. So, as you gear up for the new job, consider some of the tips listed below. They are sure to help make your transition from student to professional a bit smoother and more seamless.

Have Realistic Expectations and Demands

As you start your new job, try to remember that you are the new kid on the block. I know this may sound obvious and almost pointless to state, but often times, many grads come in and expect the world to be handed to them. They feel entitled to perks and benefits they simply haven’t earned yet. This is not to say they won’t, they just need to give it some time and allow themselves the opportunity to grow into their role. Also, don’t get offended being asked to do menial tasks you feel are below you. Granted, your superiors shouldn’t be asking you to do anything that is outside of the realm of your direct position, but if it is generally related to your job, do it and do it with a smile. Odds are every supervisor, manager and other superior you will encounter had to go through the same thing when they were starting out too, so just think of it as paying your dues—I promise it will get better.

Network

Many people think this is an activity best suited for job seekers, however that is simply not the case. Sure, you landed the job you wanted, but what are you doing now that you’re in that position? Sure you’re on the payroll and doing enough to get by, but are you standing out? If you aren’t making the effort or taking the time to interact with your colleagues, odds are you aren’t. Now, I’m not saying you need to know EVERY coworker by name, but you should at least be familiar with faces. At most jobs, many employees stick to their department or their team, but this is a mistake as it greatly decreases their opportunities for advancement. The better known you are throughout the company, the more you will be remembered, especially when it becomes time for a promotion or raise. So, branch out of your bubble and mingle—it’s good for your future!

Keep Learning

Just like networking, learning doesn’t stop when you leave the classroom. In this difficult economy, it’s important to stay on top of your skills and industry—either through seminars, workshops, or just personal reading. Sometimes, even, your company will pay for whatever activity it is you are doing, as it is a form of professional development and should make you more valuable to them as an employee. Plus, if you’re like many new grads, you will be surprised by the wealth of free-time you suddenly have since your evenings are no longer consumed with class assignments or college obligations. So, rather than wasting your time away, spend it productively by investing in your professional future.

Overall, the main key to success is to keep an open mind and approach the opportunity with positivity. After all this is a new beginning and new beginnings are supposed to be fun!

Pepper Givens is a freelance writer whose foremost passion is writing for her blog about education. While her primary writing focus is trends in higher ed, Pepper also enjoys writing about personal finance, parenting, sustainable living, small business strategies, and more. She can be reached for questions or comments at pepper.givens@gmail.com

Crisis Management

Crisis Management

Crisis Management – when disaster strikes!

Most large organizations these days, and many smaller ones, have crisis management plans. As a manager, you need to make sure that yours is up to date and that the key players know exactly what is expected of them.

If you don’t have a crisis management plan yet, you will find lots of resources on-line to help you and lots of companies willing to advise you. You will find great information on the Business Continuity Institute’s website

I hope that your crisis management plan reflects your organization’s core values. But here are some thoughts from me. 

People are really important. The right people need to be actively involved when disaster strikes. Leave status and the company hierarchy to one side when you plan your “war room”/control room. Top management may not be very useful. You need your operations’ people – the ones who know how to make things happen. No one should get into the war room unless they have a role and they are best equipped to carry it out. You can plan for this well in advance and you need to know who your specialists are and how to get hold of them.

Be Transparent. Tell the truth to your stakeholders (staff, customers, regulatory authorities, shareholders) and to the media.  Be as open as you can, within the bounds of law. With Twitter and Facebook around, it isn’t in anyone’s interest for you to start trying to throw a smoke screen over the fire, if you know what I mean! Honesty, sincerity and commitment to your staff and your customers can be tremendously disarming to potential critics.

Be clear about leadership. People get anxious and upset in a crisis, even when they try to hide it. They need a clear leader who knows how to stay calm and reassure everyone. Make sure there is a clear leader and, if it is you, focus on the task at hand, understand your goal and be ready to make decisions under pressure. That is what it means to be a leader! 

Know you priorities. In any emergency, “life” (that means people) comes first. Don’t lose sight of this. It is a good thing to remember this when you are doing your risk assessments, well ahead of the crisis. 

You need confidence to manage a crisis and if you would like to work on your confidence as a manager or a leader, please get in touch. I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

Team Skills – Are There Any Followers Left?

Team skills – today we have a guest post from Lauren Smythe who works with College City as an online instructor. She also works as a consultant teaching team skills for small and mid-sized companies.

Are There Any Followers Left?

I am a follower. There are not many of us. It seems everyone wants to be a leader. Whom will you lead if there are no followers? As a follower, I believe I have some expertise in defining the kind of person I prefer to follow. These are just a few of the characteristics I look for when I am trying to find someone worth following.

    • I want a leader to lead by example. I do not like people who delegate all the work and disappear. We are supposed to be a team. If we are all in this together, I want my leader to be there, as well. A manager is not the same thing as a leader. A manager manages. A leader leads.
    • If you lead, I will follow. If you do not know where you are going, neither will I. A leader has to have vision, a plan and the ability to communicate both. I like to think I am going somewhere when I follow someone.
    • I want a leader I can trust. It is impossible to have confidence in someone who does not feel the need to earn my trust. I can forgive a mistake, but I cannot forgive or forget a lie.
    • I want my share of the reward for the effort I put forth. As my leader, that means I would appreciate your appreciation. Let me know you are happy to have me on your team. Tell me I am doing a good job if I am. I need your feedback, so I can improve my performance. I do not mind your letting me know when I am not doing what you need, but I want you to let me know you have faith in me and believe in my ability to do what you are asking of me.
    • Treat me and all team members the same. We are all part of the team. We should respect each other. That is only possible if you respect all members of the team. We will work better together when we know we do not have to compete for your approval.
    • Ask for my help. I want to be there for you, but I cannot if you do not make the request. I want the team to succeed, so I want to do what you ask of me.
    • Admit your mistakes. We are all human. If something happened, it will not be a problem. If you do not let me know, I will feel you do not trust me. You need to earn my trust just as I need and want to earn yours.

If you are a good leader, you have every right to feel confident. When you have confidence in yourself, it is easier for me to have confidence in you. Someday I, too, may be a leader. I will learn what I need to know from you.

Lauren Smythe works with College City as an online instructor. She also works as a consultant teaching team skills for small and mid-sized companies.

  • What is Transformational Leadership?

  • How Many Leadership Styles Do You Need – Life Cycle Leadership

  • Starting a new project – are you a good team leader? Take my test and find out.

  • Chairmen, Leaders, Managers and the Blame Game.

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself!

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 7 Learning to Accept Yourself

Self acceptance – learning to accept yourself! You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals.

In the last post we thought about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. Now we are going to think about developing self acceptance.

Everyone who has ever lived has had problems.  Having problems doesn’t make you a better or worse human being – nor does it make you different.  In fact it makes you truly a human being – someone who makes mistakes and sometimes suffers misfortune. You are not what you do or what happens to you.  You are you, and one of us, the vast human race.  But it is great that you want to change or improve something about yourself!

If you accept yourself with what you see as flaws, it means you can concentrate on problem solving.  If you can’t accept yourself you can very easily be distracted by shame and the time you spend putting yourself down.

There is a great way of illustrating self acceptance.  It is called the big i/little i diagram ( Lazarus 1977)

If you look closely you will that this Big I (the self) is made up of lots of little Is. The little I’s are all the things about you; “I’m tall”, “I’m short”,” I’m fat”, “I’m thin”, “I’m good at sports”,” I’m hopeless at maths” etc.  Or they might be things that you have done; “I failed my exam”, “I hurt someone I loved”, “I give to charity”, etc.  Anyone of them may be true.  But none of them makes up the whole, wonderful complexity of you, yourself.

Now, if you can’t accept yourself, you might find this idea difficult to accept as well. But think about it.  And think about what I said in the last post about how to test self beliefs.  Think of all the evidence there is that you are complex with many aspects and experiences.  Then think about how you see other people in their complexity.  Now, think about which is the more helpful way to think about your self.

So suppose you see the things that you need to change as little Is, that you can work on.  They are not the whole big I that is going to do the work. Start to recognise yourself as complex and multi dimensional.

You could draw a large I diagram and then start to put into it all the little Is about you.  The good and the bad – make sure you are even-handed.  Now, circle some of those good Is and really concentrate on them.  Then, think about the things you want to change and let that complex, wonderful Big I you, start to make plans.

Remember, self acceptance doesn’t mean you become complacent and stop trying to make changes.  Self acceptance changes how you see the changes you want to make.  It helps to makes those changes manageable and achievable.  It means you do not waste precious time on putting your self down and feeling bad.

Self acceptance doesn’t happen over night it takes work.  It takes a little time every day thinking about the Big I and focusing on your goals to make the change you want. Work on it because the benefits of self acceptance, in terms of happiness, mental health and achievement, are huge.

The next post in this series will about strengthening and re-enforcing your new self-helping outlook.

You can learn how to develop self-esteem and to develop self acceptance and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session by Skype.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules?

Here is an interesting and thought-provoking guest post on career development from Lindsey Harper Mac.  Lindsey is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

Why “be the best” when you could be the one making the rules?

In the rat race that often develops among industry professionals vying to be regarded as reputable experts in their field, it’s easy to get fixated on goals. These lofty dreams of “being the best” are shared by many, to be sure, but they can also distort one’s perspective and lead a successful professional off their ideal path. That’s because, in many cases, professionals aren’t chasing a championship in their field so much as the trappings that come with it: higher wages, increased job security and greater career satisfaction.

But while not everyone can be the best at what they do, many can reap these benefits by keeping an open mind and considering alternative directions as their career progresses. When most people talk about making a career change, that decision is the product of discontent, job loss, or both. Few people make it through the course of their careers without changing direction at least once. Exploring these different options is healthy for anyone, prompting contemplative thought about what, exactly, they want to do with their lives.

By exploring a purposeful career transition from a specialty field to the business side of operations, professionals can build upon their existing education and expertise earned over the course of their career. Instead of throwing away one’s professional background to pursue new lines of work, a transition into business could apply a unique skill set to a new market.

Hitting the ceiling on specialized career paths

Applying a specialized skill set in an equally specialized work setting can be fulfilling, but it comes with challenges. In more specialized fields, professionals face the continued challenge of evolving as the industry changes in order to maintain their current standing. This requires professionals to continue learning and growing in order to remain relevant in the job market.

And even the job market itself can be uncertain, tethered to the whims of consumers, businesses or even industry changes that threaten to render current practices useless. In these relatively narrow professional tracts, it can be hard to continue to advance through the ranks. Those who often find themselves stagnating in a position that fails to challenge them often have additional burden of few incentives for advancement.

A potentially rewarding alternative is to leave the specialty behind and instead use those experiences to market and manage operations from the business end. In this century, focused, life-long learning comes into play when selecting the type of education courses that best serve your next career goals.

Proactively transitioning to boost your influence — and your job stability

Behind every specialized industry, there is a business element helping it thrive. These functions can vary widely, from marketing to management to human resources and beyond. A familiarity with the various specializations of a given industry can be very valuable in this environment. It also provides more control – and ultimately – power to the individual professional.

Instead of working at the whims of the marketplace and hoping to keep up and excel, professionals working on the business end can have a hand in those big decisions. By directing these operations, business personnel can directly affect how the job market progresses and how the dynamics of the industry shape the demands placed on professionals working in specialty fields.

Finally, the functions of the business end are so varied and expansive that opportunity is far more abundant. By exiting a narrow, refined line of work to one allowing professionals to easily transition within itself and advance to new levels, any professional can continue to work knowing that a sizable carrot is dangling out in front of them. The motivation and satisfaction is priceless when it comes to being happy in one’s line of work. And that happiness far outweighs any pride pursuit of reaching the top of the career pyramid.

About the author: Lindsey Harper Mac is a professional writer living in the Indianapolis area. She specializes in writing guest posts on social media and education. Currently, Lindsey is completing work on her master’s degree.

  • Career Development – Continuing Education – The Key to Professional Growth

  • Job Search When You Are In Work – Career Development in a Cold Climate

10 Simple “Truths” about Management vs. Leadership

This brilliant post comes from the Great Leadership blog 

10 Simple “Truths” about Management vs. Leadership

Taylor discovers the truth about
the Planet of the Apes, 1967

 1. Management and leadership are not the same. Not all leaders are managers and not all leaders are managers. You can be good at one and lousy at the other, or you can be good or bad at both.

2. *Managers plan and budget, organize and staff, control and solve problems, and produce predictability and order.

3. *Leaders establish direction, align people, motivate, inspire, and mentor, and produce change.

*Source: from John Kotter’s What Leaders Really Do, Harvard Business Review.

4. While leadership and management are different, they are complementary and equally important. One is not “gooder” than the other.

Wendy Smith, Career, life and Business Coach
Wendy Smith, Principal Coach, WiseWolf Life and Career Coaching

Wendy Smith is a career consultant, life coach and business coach with depth of experience in organisational development, management, coaching and personal development. That experience means she is equally at home helping clients find a new career direction, starting-up new businesses or dealing with life’s more challenging personal issues. You can contact her at wendy@wisewolfcoaching.com

Wendy has written a little eBook on how to get on with your boss and a book on job search – you can find all her books on Amazon at this link

         

 

Leading with honor

Leading with honor

Leading with honor – leadership, determination and consistent effort

Lee Ellis is Founder & President of Leadership Freedom LLC & FreedomStar Media.
He is a leadership consultant and expert in team building, executive development & assessments. He has a new book out called Leading with Honor – leadership lessons from his time in a brutal POW camp in North Vietnam.  This is an extract from his post on Linked2Leadership.

Leading with honor – we often hear of the value of 20/20 hindsight when looking back at the past.

And for me personally, this latest chapter in my life has provided much clarity on what determination and consistent effort can do for getting better results.

In facing the second half of 2012, I believe there is great benefit and encouragement to be gained by looking back—and with my new book, LEADING with HONOR: Leadership Lessons from the Hanoi Hilton out, I’ll focus this blog entry on a pressure-tested lesson learned from the POW camps of North Vietnam in something I call:

1,955 Days—Improving My German and Chin-ups One Day at a Time

Communication Breakdown

Hanoi Hilton Cell

In the early years of our POW captivity, any form of communication was forbidden between prisoners. Consequently, communicating quietly and covertly without getting caught was slow and tedious, taking much of our day.

Still, there were down times when we had to find ways to “escape” the dreary and depressing environment of a gray, smellydark dungeon, isolated from family, ten-thousand miles from home.

Making Time Count

As a goal-oriented “action” person locked in a 6.5’ x 7’ cell, I found myself driven to find ways to make the time count.

Like most of my compatriots, achievement was a high value.

It was frustrating for us because we were cut off from the normal outlets for entertainment and recreation, and especially the resources for personal growth andintellectual stimulation. We had no books or magazines and certainly no television.

Watching geckos stalk and capture bugs was a highlight.

Out of necessity and boredom, we learned the value of committing to doing something—almost anything that would give a sense of meaning.

Usually this meant a daily routine—a regimen that over time would yield progress and growth.

Get With the Program

Some guys like cellmate Glenn Myers called it a “program.” …….

You can read more of this fascinating post at this link http://linked2leadership.com/2012/07/13/on-leadership-determination-and-consistent-effort/

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 6 Change Your Core Beliefs

You can find the earlier posts in this series at the links below. In the last few posts I’ve asked you to start thinking about emotions. I’ve explained how identifying your troublesome emotion helps you gain control and make sure things turn out more positively for you in the future. As well as that, I asked you to think about what is most difficult for you, then I asked you to set some goals. Now we are going to think about challenging and beginning to change those core beliefs we all carry. They get in the way when we want to make a personal change that will improve our lives. As I’ve said before, success depends on being very honest with yourself.

We all carry unhelpful beliefs about ourselves, about other people and about the world about us. We gather them up as we go through life from our parents, our teachers, others about us and from things that happen to us. We learn to think, for example, that we are lazy or stupid. May be we think we are bad people, unworthy of happiness or success; or that people like us just never succeed! Most of these belief are not founded in anything real but we go on believing.

We may have failed at something once but that doesn’t mean we will not succeed this time or that we are less worthy of happiness.

There are three tests that we can apply to our core beliefs to see if it is worth letting them spoil the rest of our lives. They are

  • Logic

  • Reality-Testing

  • Helpfulness

Logic

If you have been unlucky enough to experience some kind of failure in life, such as, losing a job or a relationship, it isn’t logical to think of your self as a failure. Stop for one moment and think how you would judge a close friend or relation if they came to you and told you they were in the same place. What would you think and what would you say? So, why are you different? Is it sound, logical or consistent to apply different standards to you, to those you apply to the rest of the world? You are worthwhile even if you have failed lots of times – my word yes – you had the guts to try!

Reality-Testing

Does you core belief match with objective reality? Think of everything you have done throughout your life. Has every single thing been a failure? I doubt it. We all succeed at some things and fail at others. Think quietly about the good things you have done; things you have enjoyed and the things other people have liked and thanked you for. Gather evidence like a forensic detective. Where is the hard cold evidence that your core belief is really true – where does the balance of your life-long evidence lead you.

Helpfulness

What is carrying this core belief actually doing for you? Does it help you overcome your problems and feel better? Are you a “better” person because you carry this self belief? Some people do see calling themselves failures or unworthy as motivating them to do or be better. But for most of us, it just saps energy, erodes our self-esteem and makes us feel bad.

Coming to terms with the consequences of our core beliefs often helps us to have the confidence to get rid of them.

The next post in this series will about self acceptance. Accepting ourselves as we really are, is key to making that lasting change that is going to lead to real fulfilment and success in the future.

I know you can develop the confidence you need to change your core beliefs and I would like to help you.  Email me now to arrange a free half-hour taster coaching session.

Wendy Mason is a career coach working mainly with professional women who want to make that jump to senior level while having a life outside work. Before working as a coach, Wendy had a long career in both the public and private sectors in general management and consultancy as well as spells in HR. She now divides her time between face to face coaching, and coaching and blogging on-line. You can contact Wendy at wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com and find out more at http://wisewolfcoaching.com

Coming shortly – the WiseWolf Career and Personal Development Programme – if you would like to know more email wendymason@wisewolfcoaching.com

Earlier Posts in this series

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 1 Admit A Change is Needed

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 2 Be Clear About The Change You Want

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 3 Be Clear About What Is Troubling You

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 4 Identify what is most difficult for you

  • Be Successful – Making A Personal Change – Part 5 Select Your Goals for Change