3 Steps to Recover from a Mistake – Management Tip of the Day – August 23, 2010 – Harvard Business Review

While most people accept that mistakes are inevitable, no one likes to make them. The good news is that even large errors don’t have to be career-enders if they are handled well. Next time you make a blunder, follow these three steps to recover gracefully:

  1. Fess up. Trying to hide a mistake or downplay its importance can be fatal to your career. Be candid and transparent about the mistake, take responsibility for your part in it, and don’t be defensive.
  2. Make necessary changes. Mistakes are important learning opportunities. Explain to your boss and other interested parties what you will do differently going forward.
  3. Get back out there. Don’t let your errors keep you from ever taking risks again. Once the mistake is behind you, focus on the future.

3 Steps to Recover from a Mistake – Management Tip of the Day – August 23, 2010 – Harvard Business Review.

How to Be an Ideas Factory: Loosen Your Grip on Your Creations | BNET

Interview by Ian Sanders

Dave Stewart is best known as a Grammy-winning musician and producer — he was Annie Lennox’s bandmate in the Eurythmics and has collaborated with the likes of Bob Dylan and Bono. But when companies like British Telecom and the ad agency Interbrand started inviting him to speak, a hidden talent came to light: Stewart is a polymath who can connect the dots between disparate subjects, generating brave new ideas. The business world was hungry for his way of thinking, and soon he took on roles as U.S. creative director of the global ad shop the Law Firm and “change agent” for Nokia. His company Weapons of Mass Entertainment, an “ideas factory”  based in Los Angeles, works with partners including HBO and Virgin Comics on projects in film, television, publishing, theater, and interactive gaming.

Last month Stewart and Mark Simmons, the author of Punk Marketing, published The Business Playground: Where Creativity and Commerce Collide, a guide to creativity and brainstorming that introduces the straight-laced world of business to an artist’s approach to innovation.

More at

How to Be an Ideas Factory: Loosen Your Grip on Your Creations | BNET.